Sunday, April 5, 2009

Sun Valley, Idaho Part 11

Dear Reader

Sun Valley, Idaho is a beautiful town, the air is crisp and clean, the people are some of the nicest on this planet. Coming from a Southern California native, this place is Antarctica, a jacket, gloves and a hat is must, night and day. Traffic is four elk crossing the road, my lungs were not used to the clean air, I had to take a couple hits from a bottle of "LA Smog" before my lungs finally adjusted to the smog less air.

One of the most challenging feats to adjust to, was driving on snow and ice, fortunately my motor home had something called automatic traction control or ATC. This device came in handy several times, as noted in this picture. When we were finished for the day, I started the engine and engaged the transmission, nothing happen other than the wheels spun around, no traction; I panic for a second, cell range was a good seven miles south of our location. Several seconds latter the ATC engaged, all four wheels moved forward and we were on our way back to Sun Valley.

The scenery was breathtaking, the creeks and rivers are pristine, if one likes to ski, one could not pick a better place. For shooting a movie, commercial or a photo shoot, Sun Valley is the perfect place, but be warned, winter last well into April and May
and weather conditions can be dicey; plan for weather days and bring plenty of warm clothes.

Our biggest challenge on this trip was not snow, it was the wind. Now wind is not something new to a California driver who is used to Santa Ana winds, these winds were so strong you could fly a five year old. My buddy "Trent" hit a gust of wind that tore off his awning, air conditioner vent and damaged his roof, as for me the wind almost tore off my jockey box panels, fortunately I was able to do a quick repair and I was able to save it. Winter driving is always a challenge, this trip allowed me to enhance my driving skills, in the end it was great trip and I would love to return to Sun Valley, Idaho, for now I must endure the icy Southern California climate, where is my sunscreen?